Infrared shots

Shooting infrared will give your summer black-and-white shots maximum impact

The inky black skies and high-contrast look of monochrome infrared is a surefire way to give your

odd-looking results if you shoot in colour. The image will be completely red, with no other colours, so it’s much easier to predict the end result and see the effects by shooting in a monochrome Picture Style.

Infrared filters

There are several types of infrared filter, both square and round screw-in designs. However, on a standard digital camera they all have a similar effect. Hoya produces the R72 in a range of sizes that screws into the filter thread of your lens. Cokin offers the Infrared 007 filter for its three different systems – the A, P and Z-Pro. Check your lens before you buy a filter to ensure you get the appropriate size.

Above Blue skies and bright, sunny days are perfect for shooting infrared black and white

The key to shooting infrared black and white is to do it in the right weather conditions, because this will influence how much infrared ‘light’ there will

be for you to shoot. Infrared ‘light’ is essentially heat, so there is much more infrared light around on a warm, sunny day than when it’s overcast and cold. This means that summer is the ideal time to try infrared, especially when the sky is blue, and trees and plants have plenty of foliage.

images impact, but you need the right conditions, and a special filter to get the best results in-camera. An infrared filter blocks out most of the visible light from entering the lens, but allows infrared light through, so it’s almost impossible to see through the camera to focus, and your camera’s meter will struggle to measure the infrared ‘light’ accurately. This means you’ll need to use a tripod and compose your shot before you fit the filter to the lens. You should then set the focus and exposure manually. Using an infrared filter will produce some odd-looking results if you shoot in colour. The image will be completely red, with no other colours, so it’s much easier to predict the end result and see the effects by shooting in a monochrome Picture Style.

“There is more infrared light around on a warm, sunny day than when it’s overcast and cold”

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